What is Denmark’s relationship to the Schengen Area?

The Schengen Area was officially established on 26 March 1995, and through this area, over 400 million citizens of the 26 countries are free to travel without border checks.

The Schengen Agreement, which created the Schengen Area, is a designated area where 26 European nations recognize the dissolution of their internal borders to allow for the free movement of capital, goods, people and services. The Schengen Area was officially established on 26 March 1995, and through this area, over 400 million citizens of the 26 countries are free to travel without border checks.

Denmark accepted the agreement by signing it in 1996 and it was eventually merged into the Amsterdam Treaty of 1997 as well as the supranational Title IV.

Legislation was drafted to protect Denmark’s ability to consent to any possible supranational European Union rules that could potentially be introduced as an addition to the original Schengen Agreement while also considering the Danish opt-out related to the Justice and Home Affairs (JHA). The agreement also states that if Denmark does not implement a Council initiative, other Schengen Area members have the right to determine what appropriate actions will be taken, which could result in removing Denmark from the Schengen Agreement if Denmark does not put a Council initiative into effect. 

As a result of the migration crisis, in the summer of 2017 countries such as Austria, Denmark, Germany, Norway, and Sweden put controls on their borders for a limited time.

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